Lithophagous

By Michelle Cioccoloni

Lithophagous \Li*thoph"a*gous\, a. [Litho- + Gr. ? to eat.]
   (Zo["o]l.)


Eating or swallowing stones or gravel
 
The sheets of paper used in Lithophagous, based on the actual sizes of the letters Owen wrote while on the front, mostly to his mother Susan, are placed in dark green box frames, like stored memories, but there are no words.  The paper appears to be blank, but looking closer the surface of the paper can be seen to have tiny indentations.  Little stones were placed on the sheets, which were then rolled through a press leaving ghostly impressions of the stones, symbols for the pain and unpleasant events the soldiers experienced. The definition of lithophagous seems very apt indeed as the soldiers had to 'chew up and swallow down' whatever came their way, thus the apparently blank letters depict the experiences that the soldiers would have liked to write about, but didn't because their letters were always censored.

Lithophagous

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